hardware_get_started

hardware_get_started - University of Florida EEL 3701 Dr...

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Unformatted text preview: University of Florida EEL 3701 Dr. Eric M. Schwartz Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Revision 26-Aug-11 Page 1/4 Hardware: Getting Started Figure 1. Connection on a typical breadboard (protoboard). Pin 1 Pin 7 Pin 8 Pin 14 Breadboard (Protoboard) A typical breadboard (also called a protoboard) is shown in Figure 1. In this figure there are two long rows and four rows of columns. Each of the pins in a long row are electrically connected to all the other pins in that row. Similarly, the pins in the short columns are connected electrically to the other pins in that column. A chips is placed across the gap between two rows of pin columns as shown. For more info on the functioning of a breadboard, see http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/breadb.htm . A breadboard board, augmented with a few other parts, can provide you a means to build and verify the proper operation of digital circuits. Some of the useful devices are described below. Switches: Switches are the means to supply inputs to your circuits. These inputs represent variables in Boolean expressions. Each switch circuit generally also contains a resistor. LEDs: Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are used in a simple circuits to show the values of the outputs. The outputs represent variables in Boolean expressions. Each LED circuit generally also contains a resistor. Power: You will need a power supply to supply each of the components with the relevant Vcc (5V) and ground (0V) connections. CLK: A clock circuit is needed as an input device for many circuit elements. Later this semester, you will add a clock circuit that includes an SPDT switch, two resistors and an SR-latch. ICs: Integrated Circuits (also called ICs or chips) will provide the logical and other functions to create our digital circuits. Each of the ICs that we use is composed of a rectangular plastic case with two rows of metal pins along the long sides. A transparent IC is shown in Figure 1. The notch indicates the location of pin 1. Looking down on the chip, with the writing on the chip facing up and the pins facing away, turn the chip so that the notch is on the left, as shown in Figure 1. Pin 1 is on the left below the notch. Warning: This may seem trivial, but do not turn your board on until you are ready to test/debug your design. This lowers the probability that you will do the following WRONG things: connect power to ground or connect outputs together. If you do either, you may destroy your power supply or from one to several chips. Trouble-Shooting Suggestions Your circuit will probably not work the very first time. Therefore, trouble-shooting is a basic skill that you will have to learn. The followings are some helpful suggestions: Come prepared with a large, neat PRE-LAB circuit diagram, with room for notes and corrections....
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hardware_get_started - University of Florida EEL 3701 Dr...

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