3.2we - 3.2: FUNDAMENTAL SOLUTIONS OF LINEAR HOMOGENEOUS...

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HOMOGENEOUS EQUATIONS KIAM HEONG KWA We have learned in the last section that there are always two linearly independent solutions y 1 ( t ) and y 2 ( t ) to a second-order homogeneous linear equation (1) ay 00 + by 0 + cy = 0 with constant coefficients. Being linearly independent means neither y 1 ( t ) nor y 2 ( t ) is a constant multiple of the other. More formally, y 1 ( t ) and y 2 ( t ) are said to be linearly independent on their common domain, say I , if the linear relation c 1 y 1 ( t ) + c 2 y 2 ( t ) = 0, where c 1 and c 2 are some constants, holds for all t I only if c 1 = c 2 = 0. Furthermore, in this case, the general solution y ( t ) of (1) can be represented as a linear combination of y 1 ( t ) and y 2 ( t ), i.e., y ( t ) = c 1 y 1 ( t ) + c 2 y 2 ( t ), where c 1 and c 2 are integration constants. More general statements are true. That is to say, there are always two linearly independent solutions y 1 ( t ) and y 2 ( t ) to a general second- order homogeneous linear equation (2) y 00 + p ( t ) y 0 + q ( t ) y = 0 with continuous coefficients p ( t ) and q ( t ) on an open interval I . In addition, the general solution y ( t ) of (2) can be expressed as a linear combination of y 1 ( t ) and y 2 ( t ), i.e., y = c 1 y 1 ( t ) + c 2 y 2 , where c 1 and c 2 are integration constants. This raises the following questions. (1) Why are there always two linearly independent solutions to (2)? (2) Why the general solution of (2) can always be represented as a linear combination of these linearly independent solutions? The short answer to this questions is the fact that the solution space , i.e., the collection of all solutions, of (2) forms a two-dimensional vector space. The vectors are now twice-differentiable functions on the interval I . It is enlightening to compare these vectors to the vectors in the usual two-dimensional Euclidean plane spanned by the basis vectors i and j . The vectors
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2011 for the course MATH 415.01 taught by Professor Kwa during the Winter '11 term at Ohio State.

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3.2we - 3.2: FUNDAMENTAL SOLUTIONS OF LINEAR HOMOGENEOUS...

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