Superconductors

Superconductors - Adam Pescatore Ariana Breen Dylan...

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Adam Pescatore Ariana Breen Dylan Robertson Tony Tron Ryan Johnston Neil Lawley Superconductors 5/27/2011
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Prepare your research in the context of the following points: a. Definition of topic b. Current applications c. Current advantages d. Current disadvantages e. Future prospects Format: a) 5 pages long, NOT including references b) Single space c) 12 point font size d) Times New Roman font e) Justified paragraph f) Insert page number at center bottom g) Hand in only 1 report per cluster with names of all participants h) Proper referencing – use superscript on text and list references on Reference section
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Introduction? A superconductor is an element or metallic alloy which, when cooled to near absolute zero, dramatically lose all electrical resistance. Superconductivity was first discovered in 1911 when a dutch physicist named Heike Kamerlingh Onnes cooled Mercury to four degrees Kelvin. This earned him the 1913 Nobel Prize in physics. In principle, superconductors can allow electrical current to flow without any energy loss, but in practice, an ideal superconductor is very hard to produce. The type of current just described is called a supercurrent . A superconductor is a material that has absolutely no resistance to electricity. When passing an electrical current through a superconductor, there is no loss of electrical power. The Meissner effect is the expulsion of a magnetic field from a superconductor as the superconductor is transitioning to the state of zero resistance. When a material makes the transition from a normal state to a superconducting state, it actively excludes magnetic fields from its interior. There are dozens of applications of superconductors in the world today and there are going to me more as technology gets better. Superconductive transmission lines are often used in replace of power lines. Power lines dissipate ten to fifteen percent of their electricity, so using superconducting transmission lines like at the Bookhaven National laboratory, can severely reduce the dissipation rates. The superconductors used for these applications are generally made out of niobium-titanium, while liquid helium is used to
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course CHEM 124 taught by Professor Hascall during the Spring '08 term at Cal Poly.

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Superconductors - Adam Pescatore Ariana Breen Dylan...

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