Russian Democratic Audit .pdf2

Russian Democratic Audit .pdf2 - University of Toronto -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
University of Toronto - Faculty of Arts and Science Russia: A Rocky Road to Democracy Quila Toews 997556201 Professor Jeffrey Kopstein TA: Olga Kesarchuk Monday, March 16, 2010 POL103Y1: Canada in Comparative Perspective
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Introductory Statement The fall of the Soviet Union left no religious or ideological foundation among either the government or the people that allowed a framework for democracy in present day Russia (8 Johnston). Democratic development after 1990 was enacted with no moral basis, and only a country left in shambles. According to political action in the last two decades, Russia has attempted, but not fully developed into a democratic country. In Russian society, many of the fundamental pillars of democracy, are bound by a governmental system that is flawed in many ways. In this paper I will firstly address how a stable set of applied human rights is both needed, and nonexistent in Russia’s path towards a state of democracy. I will then discuss how the inner system of the government is infected with corruption, both in the financial and decision-making sense. Finally, I will explain how the government has taken over the media of Russia, which in some cases has produced fatal results. A status of a democracy is difficult to attain, as there are many criteria that must be met in order for a country to be deemed ‘free’. Civil and Political Rights The lack of a stable set of civil and political rights to protect the public is a factor that restrains Russia from achieving a status of a proper democratic country. In Russia, the fundamental rights to freedom of religion, and equal treatment regardless of race and place of origin are constantly abused. This is a prominent notion in Russian society that the government has not property faced, and fits perfectly as one of the three criteria because people cannot join together in free association, are not governed under political or social equity, and are not free from public discrimination and violence. These rights should be entrenched in society and instilled in each of its residents, which is not the case in post-Soviet Russia. Toews 2
Background image of page 2
Firstly, Russia disregarded a persons right to freedom from discrimination based on place of origin more prominently when involving its relations with ethnic Georgians. Russia has had poor relations with Georgia, their former-Soviet neighbour, ever since 1989 when they first wanted to reclaim an identity separate from the Soviet Union (Mullins). They got substantially worse when Georgian authorities temporarily detained a group of Russian service personnel as spies in the fall of 1996 (Mullins). Russia then responded to this in ways that breached Georgian rights, by persecuting and maltreating ethnic Georgians, even while a majority of them were citizens of the Russian Federation. Russia also took measures further by closing many Georgian- owned private establishments, deporting over 1000 Georgian migrants and ordering tax-checks on prominent Georgian figures (Freedom House). Alongside this type of social discrimination, the chosen religions of ethnic Russians is
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 10

Russian Democratic Audit .pdf2 - University of Toronto -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online