Lecture 31 Information Flow and DNA

Lecture 31 Information Flow and DNA - X-ray structure...

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DNA RNA protein: a diagrammatic overview of information flow in a cell 1 2 3 Synthesis of mRNA in the nucleus Movement of mRNA into cytoplasm via nuclear pore Synthesis of protein NUCLEUS CYTOPLASM DNA mRNA Ribosome Amino acids Polypeptide mRNA
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Fig. 5-27 5 end Nucleoside Nitrogenous base Phosphate group Sugar (pentose) (b) Nucleotide (a) Polynucleotide, or nucleic acid 3 end 3 C 3 C 5 C 5 C Nitrogenous bases Pyrimidines Cytosine (C) Thymine (T, in DNA) Uracil (U, in RNA) Purines Adenine (A) Guanine (G) Sugars Deoxyribose (in DNA) Ribose (in RNA) (c) Nucleoside components: sugars
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   The structure of a single DNA strand
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Figure 16.8 Base pairing in DNA
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Figure 16.7 The double helix
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Figure 16.6 Rosalind Franklin and her X-ray diffraction photo of DNA
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Unformatted text preview: X-ray structure periodicities of 0.34 nm, 2.0 nm, and 3.4 nm Figure 16.1 Watson and Crick with original double helix model 1953 How purines and pyridimines fit to form double-stranded DNA 05_08_major_minor_gr.jpg Fig. 5-28 Sugar-phosphate backbones 3' end 3' end 3' end 3' end 5' end 5' end 5' end 5' end Base pair (joined by hydrogen bonding) Old strands New strands Nucleotide about to be added to a new strand Fig. 16-9-3 A T G C T A T A G C (a) Parent molecule A T G C T A T A G C (c) Daughter DNA molecules, each consisting of one parental strand and one new strand (b) Separation of strands A T G C T A T A G C A T G C T A T A G C...
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course BSC 2010 taught by Professor Pf during the Spring '08 term at FSU.

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Lecture 31 Information Flow and DNA - X-ray structure...

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