CC-Lecture1 - CLIMATE CHANGE Todays lecture Understanding...

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CLIMATE CHANGE
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Understanding the basics of climate components Understanding how radiation relates with air movement, water movement, heat in the earth, rainfall patterns Greenhouse gases (GHG) and carbon cycle Today’s lecture…
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What is the difference between weather and climate? Time perspective Weather is what conditions of the atmosphere are over a short period of time (minutes to months) Climate is how the atmosphere "behaves" over relatively long periods of time. Includes average weather conditions regular weather sequences (like winter, spring, summer, and fall) special weather events (like tornadoes and floods) WEATHER / CLIMATE
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Weather is what we get: a hot day with pop-up thunderstorms Climate is what we expect: a very hot summer One easy way to remember…
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Worldwide climate classifications based on observable features Developed by Wladimir Koeppen
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Elements that affect climate Solar radiation Land/sea properties Air masses Ocean Currents Pressure systems Topography Atmosphere composition
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Solar Radiation The most important element of climate Insolation is a measure of solar radiation energy received on a given surface area in a given time
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Latitude Higher latitudes have longer pathlength, and thus lesser insolation Altitude Higher altitudes have shorter pathlength, and thus greater insolation Continentality Continental interiors have less cloud cover, and thus greater insolation
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course GEA 2284 taught by Professor Annaszyniszewska during the Fall '11 term at University of Florida.

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CC-Lecture1 - CLIMATE CHANGE Todays lecture Understanding...

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