What+is+geographyy

What+is+geographyy - L ecture
outline:
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Unformatted text preview: L ecture
outline:
 1.  Some
definitions
–
what
is
geography?
 2.  Most
important
concepts
 3.  5
themes
of
geography
 4.  Branches
of
geography
   Geography comes from Greek:   geo : the Earth   + graphia: the description (originally to write)   The study is defined in various ways:   The scientific study of the Earth's surface and its various climates, countries, peoples, and natural resources. (American Heritage Dictionary)   The study of the natural features of the earth's surface, including topography, climate, soil, vegetation, etc, and man's response to them (Collins Dictionary) 
“mere
names
of
places...
are
not
geography...
know
by
heart
 a
whole
gazetteer
full
of
them
would
not,
in
itself,
constitute
 anyone
a
geographer.
Geography
has
higher
aims
than
this:
 it
seeks
to
classify
phenomena
(alike
of
the
natural
and
of
 the
political
world,
in
so
far
as
it
treats
of
the
latter),
to
 compare,
to
generalize,
to
ascend
from
effects
to
causes,
 and,
in
doing
so,
to
trace
out
the
great
laws
of
nature
and
to
 mark
their
influences
upon
man.
This
is
'a
description
of
the
 world'—that
is
Geography.
In
a
word
Geography
is
a
 Science—a
thing
not
of
mere
names
but
of
argument
and
 reason,
of
cause
and
effect.”



 
 
 
 
 
 
—
William
Hughes,
1863
   Geography: The study of spatial patterns and trends on the Earth’s surface   What can be described spatially?   Location, direction, distance of a place.   Absolute versus Relative.   Physical/cultural attributes of a place.   Spatial interaction between places.   Spatial diffusion from places.   Density, dispersion, pattern.   Regions (formal, functional, perceptual).   Size and scale (the degree of generalization). 1.
Location
–
WHERE
is
it?
 2.
Place
–
WHAT
is
it
like
there?
 3.
Human/Environment
Interaction
–
HOW
do
people
 interact
with
the
environment?
 4.
Movement
–
HOW
is
the
place
connected
to
other
 places?
 5.
Region
–
what
are
the
common
features?
   Where
are
we?

Where
is
it?
   Two
types
of
location
   Absolute
location
   Relative
location
   Absolute
location
   A
unique
or
exact
position
on
the
Earth's
surface
   Coordinate
Systems
(Latitude
and
Longitude)
   Room
Numbers
   Street
Addresses
   Relative
location
   A
position
described
solely
with
reference
to
another
 location
   Directions
from
a
certain
place
(3rd
house
on
the
left,
etc.)
   “Soft”
locations
(near,
next
to,
beyond,
etc.)
   Every
point
on
Earth
has
a
specific
location

   Global:
latitude
and
longitude‐an
imaginary
grid
of
lines
   Local:

a
street
address

   Latitude: 
29°
39'
5"
N

 29
degrees,
39
minutes,






5
 seconds
North
   Longitude: 
82°
19'
30"
W

 82
degrees,
19
minutes,
30
 seconds
West   Where
a
place
is
in
relation
to
another
place
   Described
by
landmarks,
time,
direction
or
distance.
From
one
 place
to
another.
   What
is
the
relative
location
 of
Florida?
   Florida
is
positioned
in
both
 the
northern
and
western
 hemispheres.
Located
in
the
 far‐
southeastern
region
of
the
 United
States,
a
part
of
North
 America,
Florida
is
bordered
by
 the
states
of
Georgia
and
 Alabama
and
by
the
Atlantic
 Ocean,
Gulf
of
Mexico
and
the
 Straits
of
Florida.   People
   Culture
   Language
   Religion
   Buildings
and
 Landmarks
   Economy
   Politics
   Cities S grand for a Day Eiffel Hall Beijing-Forbidden City's Saudi Arabia Women ofamurai Tower   Land
forms
and
 features
   Soils
   Climate
   Bodies
of
water
   etc
 Category 4 Tornado, South Dakota Malaysia's Mount Kinabalu Tarangire National Park in Tanzania, Africa   Place
   
an
area
with
definite
or
indefinite
boundaries
or
a
 portion
of
space
   Space
   The
defined
area
where
features
and
entities
exist
and
 events
occur
   Space
can
be
viewed
in
different
scales.
   Tobler’s
(b.
1930)
First
Law
of
Geography
   "Everything
is
related
to
everything
else,
but
near
things
 are
more
related
to
each
other"
   Space
does
not
necessarily
have
 to
be
“Euclidian
space”
   Euclid
(fl
300
BC)
was
a
Greek
 mathematician
who
laid
the
 basis
for
modern
geometry.
   His
system
focused
on
a
space
 defined
by
(three)
linear
 dimensions.

   Non‐Euclidian
spaces
are
 harder
to
define,
but
exist.
   What
“spaces”
could
you
think
 of
that
are
hard
to
define
with
 coordinates?

   How
do
humans
and
the
 environment
affect
each
other?
   geographers
look
at
how
people
 interact
with
their
surroundings
 People
.
.
.
   Adapt
to
the
environment
   Modify
the
environment
   Depend
on
the
environment
 Hoover Dam   How
are
 people,
goods,
 ideas
moved
 from
place
to
 place?
   The
mobility
of
   People
   Species
   Goods
   Ideas
   Air
Traffic
Map
(2008)
   Internet
traffic
flow
map
   What
Places
Have
in
 Common
   Formal
regions
   political
boundaries
   Functional
regions
   Cell
phone
service
area
   Delineated
regions
   Distribution
of
species,
 religions,
languages
   Vernacular
regions
   Middle
east
 It’s
all
about
human,
environment
and
its
 interaction
in
space
and
time
   Physical Geography           Biogeography         Conservation and Development Protected areas Land use/Land cover change Human Geography           Landscape ecology Wildlife ecology Speciation/Animal Movement Human/Environment Interactions         Landforms Geomorphology Soil Sciences Atmospheric Sciences Urban Geography Social Geography Economic Geography Political Geography Techniques       Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Remote Sensing Spatial Statistics   What
do
geographers
do?
   Final
project
–
details,
Q/A
 ...
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course GEA 2284 taught by Professor Annaszyniszewska during the Fall '11 term at University of Florida.

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