Ionization Energy and Electron Affinity

Ionization Energy and Electron Affinity - Ionization Energy...

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Ionization Energy and Electron Affinity The process of gaining or losing an electron requires energy. There are two common ways to measure this energy change: ionization energy and electron affinity. Ionization Energy The ionization energy is the energy it takes to fully remove an electron from the atom. When several electrons are removed from an atom, the energy that it takes to remove the first electron is called the first ionization energy, the energy it takes to remove the second electron is the second ionization energy, and so on. In general, the second ionization energy is greater than first ionization energy. This is because the first electron removed feels the effect of shielding by the second electron and is therefore less strongly attracted to the nucleus. If a particular ionization energy follows a previous electron loss that emptied a subshell, the next ionization energy will take a rather large leap, rather than follow its normal gently increasing trend. This fact helps to show that just as electrons are more stable when they have a full valence shell, they are also relatively more stable when they at least have a full subshell. Ionization Energy Across a Period
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Ionization Energy and Electron Affinity - Ionization Energy...

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