Properties of a Bond

Properties of a Bond - Properties of a Bond The way bond...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Properties of a Bond The way bond properties were chosen to characterize bonds have a historical basis. Scientists made their first rational attempts to describe bonding by looking at data they could collect about bonds. We too will look at the experimental data on bonds to try to analyze bonding. Perhaps the most useful aspect to know of a bond is its strength. Weak bonds are easily broken and molecules with such bonds are fairly reactive. Conversely, strong bonds are difficult to break and give rise to stable molecules. Therefore, it is sensible to define bond strength as the amount of energy needed to break a chemical bond. Trends in bond strength show that homoatomic bonds (those formed between atoms of the same element) tend to be strong. But going across a row in the periodic table, the trend in bond strength may not be regular. For example, period 2 elements have the following strength order: Li-Li > Be-Be < B-B < C-C < N-N > O-O > F-F. This irregular trend is repeated in period 3 homoatomic bonds. If we look at bond strength data,
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course CHEM ch 101 taught by Professor - during the Fall '10 term at Montgomery.

Page1 / 2

Properties of a Bond - Properties of a Bond The way bond...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online