The Octet Rule

The Octet Rule - Instead they seek to fill their outer...

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The Octet Rule The discussion of valence electron configurations leads us to one of the cardinal tenets of chemical bonding, the octet rule. The octet rule states that atoms become especially stable when their valence shells gain a full complement of valence electrons. For example, in above, Helium (He) and Neon (Ne) have outer valence shells that are completely filled, so neither has a tendency to gain or lose electrons. Therefore, Helium and Neon, two of the so-called Noble gases, exist in free atomic form and do not usually form chemical bonds with other atoms. Most elements, however, do not have a full outer shell and are too unstable to exist as free atoms.
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Unformatted text preview: Instead they seek to fill their outer electron shells by forming chemical bonds with other atoms and thereby attain Noble Gas configuration. An element will tend to take the shortest path to achieving Noble Gas configuration, whether that means gaining or losing one electron. For example, sodium (Na), which has a single electron in its outer 3 s orbital, can lose that electron to attain the electron configuration of neon. Chlorine, with seven valence electrons, can gain one electron to attain the configuration of argon. When two different elements have the same electron configuration, they are called isoelectronic....
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course CHEM ch 101 taught by Professor - during the Fall '10 term at Montgomery.

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