Units - Units Defining Units When trying to describe the...

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Units Defining Units When trying to describe the quantity or quality of something, whether a chemical substance or physical phenomenon, it is helpful to have some standard measure to refer to. A unit is nothing more than a standard by which a measured value can be described. For instance, in the old English system, a foot was just that--the length of a man's foot. This was helpful in that when a distance between, say, a house and a water well was described in feet, one who had never seen the dwelling in question would have an instant idea of how far away the well was, based solely on a verbal description. The concept today hasn't changed, although our standards make better scientific sense and are more exact. Systems of Units There are two different sets of units used in scientific measurements: British Engineering units and the metric system (also called the Standard International (SI) system). Both are based on standards, though those underlying the British system can be shockingly inscrutable. The metric
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Units - Units Defining Units When trying to describe the...

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