Economic Mobility:Inequality Final Draft

Economic Mobility:Inequality Final Draft - Running Head:...

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Unformatted text preview: Running Head: Economic Mobility Economic Mobility Vanessa Reapor California Polytechnic State University 1 Running Head: Economic Mobility Abstract The American Dream, the national promise of equal opportunity and the endless possibilities of economic mobility, has and is still deeply inculcated in American culture. However, there is less economic mobility in the United States than originally thought as proven by many studies of economists, and therefore refutes the basic ideas of the American Dream. Class, one of the major causes to the decrease in economic mobility, remains a sensitive subject in America. This sensitivity stems from popular culture ideals of not debating or discussing class as well as the many myths Americans and foreigners are trapped into believing. Variations in the American life-styles, a component of the ideas of class presented by Mantsios, is another factor to the reduction of economic mobility. This variation is mainly a result of the diversity in the United States and its heterogeneous society. Race, a social construct, is also a major source to economic mobility. Through the help of the media, society has shaped Americans into associating success and wealth with Caucasians, and failure and poverty with minorities. Another major cause to the decline in economic mobility is parental influence, the idea of a child following or straying away from their parent or guardians footsteps. Education, Americas token to success, also determines an individuals economic mobility. In American culture, it is believed that by furthering or completing education automatically guarantees individuals endless opportunities to a job, increased income and upward mobility. In conclusion, class, race, parental influence and education are all interrelated factors to economic mobility. Keywords: Economic Mobility, American Dream, Class, Race, Parental Influence, and Education 2 Running Head: Economic Mobility The American Dream, the national promise of equal opportunity and the endless possibilities of economic mobility, has and is still deeply inculcated in American culture. Economic Mobility or sometimes referred to as Intergenerational Economic Mobility describes the capabilities of an individual to improve their economic and social status within his or her lifetime, and can be measured in absolute or relative terms. Absolute Mobility emerges because of economic growthchildren will have a higher standard of living than their parents or guardians. Relative Mobility, in contrast, transpires despite of what is currently happening in the economy as well as in society, and suggests that individuals can change their ranks relative to others due to the values of meritocracyan individually based method where people are rewarded on personal talents, skills, etc. However, there is less economic mobility in the United rewarded on personal talents, skills, etc....
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course ECON 01 taught by Professor Clairebattista during the Fall '10 term at Cal Poly.

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Economic Mobility:Inequality Final Draft - Running Head:...

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