Features of Flowers

Features of Flowers - Features of Flowers

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Features of Flowers Flowers arise from apical meristems similar to vegetative shoots but, unlike them, have  determinate growth. The floral primordia develop into four different kinds of specialized  leaves that are borne in whorls at the tip of the stem ( see Figure  1  ). The two outer  whorls are sterile, the inner two fertile. The first formed outer whorl —the  calyx — is the  most leaflike and its individual parts, the  sepals , often are green. The  petals  of the next  whorl, the  corolla , frequently are brightly colored and in a majority of flowers retain  some semblance to leaves. (Together the calyx and the corolla are called the  perianth .)  The next two whorls, the  androecium  and the  gynoecium , are composed of highly  modified reproductive structures that have lost their leaf-like appearance. The  androecium is composed of  stamens
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course BIO 1421 taught by Professor Farr during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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