Mendelian Genetics

Mendelian Genetics - Mendelian Genetics The breeding...

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Unformatted text preview: Mendelian Genetics The breeding experiments of the monk Gregor Mendel in the mid-1800s laid the groundwork for the science of genetics. He published only two papers in his lifetime and died unheralded in 1884. The significance of his paper published in 1866 on inheritance in peas (which he grew in the monastery garden) apparently went unnoticed for the next 34 years until three separate botanists, who also were theorizing about heredity in plants, independently cited the work in 1900. During the next 30 years, the universality of his findings was confirmed, and breeding programs for better livestock and crop plantsand the science of geneticswere well under way. At the time of Mendel's work, scientists widely believed that offspring blended the characteristics of their parents, but Mendel's painstaking experimentation suggested this was not so. Remember, no their parents, but Mendel's painstaking experimentation suggested this was not so....
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