A Typical Bryophyte Life Cycle

A Typical Bryophyte - A Typical Bryophyte Life Cycle Although individuals of the three bryophyte groups differ from one another morphologically and

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Unformatted text preview: A Typical Bryophyte Life Cycle Although individuals of the three bryophyte groups differ from one another morphologically and in other details, the moss life cycle shown in Figure 1 is typical of the group in general. As do all plants, bryophytes alternate a gametophytic generation with a sporophytic one (a sporic meiosis, a life cycle in which meiosis gives rise to spores, not gametes). Each of the haploid (1 n ) spores is capable of developing into a multicellular, haploid individual, the gametophyte. The first structure formed from spores in most mosses and many liverworts is a filamentous, algal-like, green protonema (plural, protonemata). In some mosses the protonemata are long lived with rhizoids and aerial filaments and they often form dense green mats in suitable sites. Cells in the protonema, probably stimulated by red light and kinetin, give rise to shoots, which enlarge and become the...
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course BIO 1421 taught by Professor Farr during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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