Ecosystem Structure

Ecosystem Structure - Ecosystem Structure: Plant Communities

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ecosystem Structure: Plant Communities The plant community usually is the largest visible part of an ecosystem, and often both the  community and the ecosystem are named for the  dominant  plants present—that is, the plants that,  by virtue of their size or numbers, modify and control the environment. The community is not a  haphazard collection of organisms, but consists of  populations  of individuals whose  tolerance  ranges —the range of environmental  conditions in which individuals of a particular species will grow —match those of the site.  Succession Even the most stable ecosystems are in constant, normal flux. One of the easiest ecological  processes to observe is  succession , the change in the composition of the vegetation of a particular  site over time. Two kinds occur.  Primary succession  takes place on newly exposed surfaces such  as might appear after a volcanic eruption or following a rockslide in the mountains. 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course BIO 1421 taught by Professor Farr during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online