Phylum Lycophyta

Phylum Lycophyta - Phylum Lycophyta: Club Mosses and More

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Phylum Lycophyta: Club Mosses and More The lycophytes are the oldest of the seedless vascular plants that have living representatives. They  constitute one of the two major lines (clades) of vascular plants, which split probably in the Silurian  Age, but at least by the Devonian. For the last 400 million years, therefore, they have developed  independently from the rest of the vascular plants. During this time, they evolved from small,  semiaquatic herbaceous plants to huge trees that dominated the Coal Age forests for 40 million  years and then, as continental masses shifted and the climate dried, they declined in importance  until most became extinct by late Carboniferous-early Permian time. Their structural features show  convergence with taxa on the line leading to the flowering plants. Leaves, wood, trees, and  reproductive structures that resemble seeds evolved in both lineages.
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course BIO 1421 taught by Professor Farr during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Phylum Lycophyta - Phylum Lycophyta: Club Mosses and More

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