NEW Society_Notes_Chapter 17_Health Care and Globalization

NEW Society_Notes_Chapter 17_Health Care and Globalization...

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Unformatted text preview: 11/10/11 Chapter17: Health and Aging Chapter Summary We tend to equate health care with medical care generally provided by physicians located in clinics or hospitals. However, the most common forms of health care consists not of medical and hospital care, but rather of self-care and informal care, generally provided by family members. When it comes to formal health-care services, home care is particularly important to the health and well-being of older adults, yet it is not included in Canadas nationally insured health-care system (medicare). Increased emphasis is being placed on privatization and profit-making within Canadas health-care system, particularly when it comes to services that are most important to older adults. The implications are that those most in need of care will be least likely to access it and the most likely to have to rely on themselves and family members for care. Health Care and Globalization Self-Care and Informal Care Self-care is the range of activities that individuals undertake to enhance health, prevent disease, and restore...
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course SOCIOLOGY 101 taught by Professor Brimm during the Fall '08 term at University of Toronto- Toronto.

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NEW Society_Notes_Chapter 17_Health Care and Globalization...

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