Exp. #7 - Al-Quds University Faculty of Engineering...

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ميحرلا ن±حرلا ه²لا مسب Al-Quds University Faculty of Engineering “Electronics Engineering” Electronics Lab “Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT) Characteristics” “Experiment #7” Supervisor: “Eng. Mohammad Obeid” Prepared by: “Judeh Walid Judeh Shahwan” [20710120] “Murad Ali Rabaih” [20610460] Work Team: “Judeh Shahwan, Murad Rabaih”
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13/12/2009 Table of Contents 7.1 Introduction…………………………………………………………. .……. 2 7.2 Theoretical Background……………………………. . ………………. .…. . 3 7.3 .…………………………. .……. . 6 7.4 Discussion……………………………………………………………. .…… 9 7.5 Conclusion………………………………………………. …………. .……10 2
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7.1 “Introduction” A bipolar (junction) transistor (BJT) is a three-terminal electronic device constructed of doped semiconductor material and may be used in amplifying or switching applications. Bipolar transistors are so named because their operation involves both electrons and holes . Charge flow in a BJT is due to bidirectional diffusion of charge carriers across a junction between two regions of different charge concentrations. This mode of operation is contrasted with unipolar transistors, such as field-effect transistors , in which only one carrier type is involved in charge flow due to drift . By design, most of the BJT collector current is due to the flow of charges injected from a high-concentration emitter into the base where they are minority carriers that diffuse toward the collector, and so BJTs are classified as minority-carrier devices. Equipments: 1) DMM. 2) 3) 5 KOhm, 1 MOhm Potentiometer. 4) Transistor. 5) Power Supply. 3
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7.2 “Theoretical Background” An NPN transistor can be considered as two diodes with a shared anode . In typical operation, the emitter–base junction is forward biased and the base–collector junction is reverse biased . In an NPN transistor, for example, when a positive voltage is applied to the base–emitter junction, the equilibrium between thermally generated carriers and the repelling electric field of the depletion region becomes unbalanced, allowing thermally excited electrons to inject into the base region. These electrons wander (or "diffuse ") through the base from the region of high concentration near the emitter towards the region of low concentration near the collector. The electrons in the base are called minority carriers because the base is doped p-type which would make holes the majority carrier in the base. To minimize the percentage of carriers that recombine
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course COMPUTER E 444 taught by Professor Amigo during the Fall '10 term at Al-Quds University.

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Exp. #7 - Al-Quds University Faculty of Engineering...

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