Exp. #8 & #9 - Al-Quds University Faculty of...

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ميحرلا ن±حرلا ه²لا مسب Al-Quds University Faculty of Engineering “Electronics Engineering” Electronics Lab Supervisor: “Eng. Mohammad Obeid” Prepared by: “Judeh Walid Judeh Shahwan” [20710120] “Murad Ali Rabaih” [20610460] Work Team: “Judeh Shahwan, Murad Rabaih”
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20/12/2009 Table of Contents 8&9.1 Introduction……………………………. .………………………. .……. 2 8&9.2 Theoretical Background………………. .………. . ………………. .…. . 3 8&9.3 .……. . 6 8&9.4 Discussion…………………………………. ..…………. .………. .…… 12 8&9.5 Conclusion…………………………………. ..………. …………. .……14 2
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8&9.1 “Introduction” BJT Biasing: In general all electronic devices are nonlinear, and device operating characteristics can vary significantly over the range of parameters over which the device operates. The bipolar transistor, for example, has a ‘normal’ operating collector voltage range bounded by saturation for low voltages and collector junction breakdown for high voltages. Similarly the collector current is bounded by dissipation considerations on the one hand and cutoff on the other hand. In order to function properly the transistor must be biased properly, i.e., the steady-state operating voltages and currents must suit the purpose involved. Our primary concern here however is not to determine what an appropriate operating point is. That determination depends on a particular context of use and even so often involves a degree of judgment in choosing between conflicting preferences. Rather we suppose in general that an operating point is specified (somehow) and the task considered is how to go about establishing and maintaining that operating point. Where a specific context is needed for an illustration we assume usually that the transistor is to provide linear voltage amplification for a symmetrical signal, i.e., a signal with equal positive and negative excursions about a steady-state value. Equipments: 1) DMM 2) DC Power Supply 3) 2N3904, 2N2222 Transistors. 4) 680 Ohm, 2.7 KOhm, 1.8 KOhm, 6.8 KOhm, 33 KOhm, 3 KOhm, 2.2 KOhm, 390KOhm, 1 MOhm Resistors. 3
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.2 “Theoretical Background” 4
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Voltage Divider Bias Configuration 5
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Collector Feedback Bias .3 Emitter Feedback Bias 6
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8&9.3 Exp #8 Rc meas = 2.68 KOhm R B meas : = 989 KOhm For 2N3904 V BE meas = 0.69 (V) V BE calculated = 0.7 (V) V B
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course COMPUTER E 444 taught by Professor Amigo during the Fall '10 term at Al-Quds University.

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Exp. #8 & #9 - Al-Quds University Faculty of...

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