Chap10_DiscriminantAnalysis

Chap10_DiscriminantAnalysis - Chapter 10 Discriminant...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 10 Discriminant Analysis Galit Shmueli and Peter Bruce 2008 Data Mining for Business Intelligence Shmueli, Patel & Bruce Discriminant Analysis: Background A classical statistical technique Used for classification long before data mining Classifying organisms into species Classifying skulls Fingerprint analysis And also used for business data mining ( loans, customer types, etc.) Can also be used to highlight aspects that distinguish classes ( profiling ) Small Example: Riding Mowers Goal : classify purchase behavior (buy/no-buy) of riding mowers based on income and lot size Outcome : owner or non-owner (0/1) Predictors : lot size, income Can we manually draw a line that separates owners from non-owners? Example: Loan Acceptance In the prior small example, separation is clear In data mining applications, there will be more records, more predictors, and less clear separation Consider Universal Bank example with only 2 predictors: Outcome: accept/dont accept loan Predictors: Annual income (Income) Avg. monthly credit card spending (CCAvg) Sample of 200 customers 5000 customers Algorithm for Discriminant Analysis The Idea To classify a new record, measure its distance from the center of each class Then, classify the record to the closest class Step 1: Measuring Distance Need to measure each records distance from the center of each class The center of a class is called a centroid The centroid is simply a vector (list) of the means of each of the predictors. This mean is computed from all the records that belong to that class....
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course MAR 08 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Youngstown State University.

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Chap10_DiscriminantAnalysis - Chapter 10 Discriminant...

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