phil 120 - arguement guide

phil 120 - arguement guide - Guide for Argument Quiz...

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Guide for Argument Quiz Argument A set of reasons and evidence offered in support of a conclusion. Arguments in this sense must be distinguished from verbal disputes or disagreements. Conclusion Statement or claim supported by the premises of an argument. Premise Statement (reason or evidence) that serves to support the conclusion of an argument. Logic The study of correct reasoning. Deductive argument An argument where (if the form is valid) the truth of the premises guarantees the truth of the con- clusion. Modus ponens and modus tollens are two examples of deductive argument forms. Inductive argument An argument whose conclusion may be probable but not certain. Generalizations from experi- ence and arguments by analogy are examples of inductive arguments. They can be more or less plausible or probable, but never absolutely certain. Modus ponens A deductive argument of the form: if p then q p ----------- q
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Modus Tollens A deductive argument of the form: if p then q not-q ----------- not-p
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phil 120 - arguement guide - Guide for Argument Quiz...

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