p34_005 - 5. (a) Suppose that at time t1 , the moon is...

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5. (a) Suppose that at time t 1 , the moon is starting a revolution (on the verge of going behind Jupiter, say) and that at this instant, the distance between Jupiter and Earth is ` 1 . The time of the start of the revolution as seen on Earth is t 1 = t 1 + ` 1 /c . Suppose the moon starts the next revolution at time t 2 and at that instant, the Earth-Jupiter distance is ` 2 . The start of the revolution as seen on Earth is t 2 = t 2 + ` 2 /c . Now, the actual period of the moon is given by T = t 2 t 1 and the period as measured on Earth is T = t 2 t 1 = t 2 t 1 + ` 2 c ` 1 c = T + ` 2 ` 1 c . The period as measured on Earth is longer than the actual period. This is due to the fact that Earth moves during a revolution, and light takes a Fnite time to travel from Jupiter to Earth. ±or the situation depicted in ±ig. 34-38, light emitted at the end of a revolution travels a longer distance to get to Earth than light emitted at the beginning. Suppose the position of Earth is given by the
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This note was uploaded on 11/12/2011 for the course PHYS 2001 taught by Professor Sprunger during the Fall '08 term at LSU.

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