CH 1 - Chapter1 BasicTerminology Learning objectives After...

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Chapter 1 Basic Terminology Learning objectives After reading this chapter, the student will be able to: 1. Define mechanics, biomechanics, and kinesiology and differentiate among their uses in the analysis of human movement. 2. Define and provide examples of linear and angular motion. 3. Define kinematics and kinetics. 4. Explain the difference between relative and absolute reference systems. 5. Define sagittal, frontal, and transverse planes along with corresponding anteroposterior, mediolateral, and longitudinal axes. Provide examples of human movements that occur in each plane. 6. Explain degree of freedom and provide examples of degrees of freedom associated with numerous joints in the body. 7. Describe the location of segments or landmarks using correct anatomical terms, such as medial, lateral, proximal, and distal. 8. Identify segments by their correct name, define all segmental movement descriptors, and provide specific examples in the body.
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Qualitative Nonnumerical Based on direct observation Equipment not necessary Focus on time and space Examples: Rotation of femur during  golf swing Adduction of humerus  during freestyle swim Quantitative Numerical Based on data collected Equipment necessary Focus on forces Examples: Stress on shoulder during  baseball pitch Compression force on  femur during landing
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Core Areas of Study Biomechanics vs. Kinesiology Biomechanics was defined by the American Society of Biomechanics (1)  as “the application of the laws of mechanics to animate motion.” Another  definition proposed by the European Society of Biomechanics (2) is “the  study of forces acting on and generated within a body and the effects of  these forces on the tissues, fluid, or materials used for the diagnosis,  treatment, or research purposes.” kinesiology as the scientific study of human movement can be an umbrella  term used to describe any form of anatomical, physiological, psychological,  or mechanical human movement evaluation.
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Biomechanics vs. Kinesiology Kinesiology:  Scientific study of human movement Anatomical, physiological, psychological, biomechanical Biomechanics: Application of mechanics to biological systems More specific than kinesiology Core Areas of Study
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Biomechanics vs. Kinesiology Anatomy vs. Functional Anatomy Anatomy, the science of the structure of the body, is the base of  the pyramid from which expertise about human movement is  developed. Functional anatomy is the study of the body components needed 
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CH 1 - Chapter1 BasicTerminology Learning objectives After...

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