2011_Lecture_Notes

2011_Lecture_Notes - 1 Cellular Transport Processes...

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1 Cellular Transport Processes Physiology 3061//5061 David Levitt: 3-120 Jackson Phone: 612 625 7649 Email: levit001@umn.edu Introductory Questions: Before starting these lectures, I want you to briefly try to answer the following 4 questions. Some of you may know this material from previous courses and others my have never seen it before. In either case, just try to insert (or guess) the answers without looking ahead in the notes. The main purpose of these questions is to illustrate what is covered in this set of lectures is simple, fundamental material that has important implications for nearly all biological functions. 1. Shown above is a “typical” mammalian cell. Which of the following is the best estimate of its diameter (in units of centimeters = cm)? 1. 0.3 cm 2. 0.03 cm 3. 0.003 cm 4. 0.0003 cm 5. 0.00003 cm 2. The heavy line surrounding the cell is the “plasma membrane”. Which of the following the best estimate of its thickness? 1. 0.005 cm 2. 0.0005 cm 3. 0.00005 cm 4. 0.000005 cm 5. 0.0000005 cm 3. The “plasma membrane” determines what goes in and out of the cell. Listed below are a series of solutes. After each solute – put a “P” if the membrane is permeable (1) (2) (4)
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2 to the solute (i.e. solute passes relatively freely across the membrane) on an “I” if the membrane is impermeable to the solute. 1. Oxygen (O 2 ) 2. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). 3. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP). 4. Calcium. 5. Glucose. 6. DNA. 4. The dashed arrow in the cell indicates the movement of a signaling molecule from the inner surface of the cell membrane to the nucleus. What is the mechanism of this movement? 1. Movement along a protein network that acts like a conveyor belt. 2. Movement in an intracellular fluid streams created by the beating of cilia. 3. Movement of vesicles along the endoplasmic reticulum. 4. Diffusion.
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1 Cellular Transport Processes Physiology 3061/3063/5061 David Levitt: 2-161 Jackson Phone: 612 625 7649 Email: levit001@umn.edu Outline of Lectures: I. Introduction. II. The structure of the cell membrane A. Lipid structure of cell membrane B. Protein structure of cell membrane. III. Diffusion and movement through cell membranes A. Diffusion and thermal motion. B. Permeability of lipid bilayer. C. Time dependent (non-steady state) diffusion. IV. Electrical Membrane Potentials V. Osmotic Pressure. VI. Protein Mediated Transport. I. Introduction. These notes represent a nearly complete summary of my lectures for this section. Most of the exam questions will be on material covered in these notes. I also refer to pages in your textbook (Vander, 11 th or 12 th edition) that you can use for additional background. These lectures will discuss a number of topics that are of general importance for all cells. This material should provide a useful background for the organ systems lectures Epithelial mucosa Muscle Fig. 1A Fig. 1B
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2 that will follow these lectures. In order to provide some focus for this very general subject, these lectures will concentrate on just one cell type that illustrates many of the important properties - the human small intestinal epithelial cell. This cell type was
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2011_Lecture_Notes - 1 Cellular Transport Processes...

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