Cell Therapy for Heart Disease - To genetically modify or not, that is the question

Cell Therapy for Heart Disease - To genetically modify or not, that is the question

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Muzammil Mushtaq, Behzad N. Oskouei and Joshua M. Hare Question Cell Therapy for Heart Disease : To Genetically Modify or Not, That Is the ISSN: 1524-4571 Copyright © 2011 American Heart Association. All rights reserved. Print ISSN: 0009-7330. Online TX 72514 Circulation Research is published by the American Heart Association. 7272 Greenville Avenue, Dallas, doi: 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.111.240218 2011, 108:398-401 Circulation Research http://circres.ahajournals.org/content/108/4/398 located on the World Wide Web at: The online version of this article, along with updated information and services, is http://www.lww.com/reprints Reprints: Information about reprints can be found online at journalpermissions@lww.com 410-528-8550. E-mail: Fax: Kluwer Health, 351 West Camden Street, Baltimore, MD 21202-2436. Phone: 410-528-4050. http://circres.ahajournals.org//subscriptions/ Subscriptions: Information about subscribing to Circulation Research is online at at UNIV OF MINNESOTA on November 6, 2011 http://circres.ahajournals.org/ Downloaded from
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Cell Therapy for Heart Disease To Genetically Modify or Not, That Is the Question Muzammil Mushtaq, Behzad N. Oskouei, Joshua M. Hare C ell-based therapy for heart diseases, ranging from myocardial infarction, hibernating myocardium, to ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies, is a poten- tially transformative approach to address unmet needs for the treatment of these chronic diseases. 1 As this field moves forward rapidly, pressing questions continue to require resolution. Of these, perhaps the most pressing question is what are the features of an ideal cell type to be used for cardiovascular therapeutics. 1 In this context, several investigative teams have under- taken the approach of starting with a reasonable candid- ate cell, whether that be an adult stem cell, such as a mesenchymal stem cell 2 (MSC) or cardiac stem cell (CSC), 3,4 or a pluripotent stem cell, 5 and then enhancing that cell by genetic modification or incubation with factors or cytokines 6 capable of optimizing the ability of the cell to engraft, survive, and/or differentiate. This approach has uniformly produced positive results using MSCs and CSCs with a number of genetic modifications (Table). In this issue of Circulation Research , Cho et al show that overexpression of the serine/threonine kinase glycogen syn- thase kinase (GSK)-3 ± enhances the therapeutic properties of bone marrow–derived MSCs in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. 7 These encouraging findings add to a growing list of kinases, the overexpression of which enhances MSC engraftment and differentiation into myocytes. These sets of experiments are highly valuable to help
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Cell Therapy for Heart Disease - To genetically modify or not, that is the question

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