Sensation and Perception Lecture for PSY 1001

Sensation and Perception Lecture for PSY 1001 - Sensation...

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Sensation and Perception
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The Major Senses There are 6 major senses vision hearing touch taste pain smell The list can be extended with balance, joint senses and others Vision has been studied most extensively
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Principles of Sensation Transduction—physical energy to neural signal Absolute threshold—smallest strength of a stimulus that can be detected Difference threshold—(jnd) smallest difference that can be detected Sensory adaptation
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Vision Purpose of the visual system transform light energy into an electro- chemical neural response represent characteristics of objects in our environment such as size, color, shape, and location
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Light: The Visual Stimulus
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Light: The Visual Stimulus Light can be described as both a particle and a wave. Wavelength of a light is the distance of one complete cycle of the wave. Visible light has wavelengths from about 400nm to 700nm. Wavelength of light is related to its perceived color.
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Distribution of Rods and Cones Cones—concentrated in center of eye (fovea) approx. 6 million Rods—concentrated in periphery approx. 120 million Blind spot—region with no rods or cones
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Differences Between Rods and Cones Cones allow us to see in bright light allow us to see fine spatial detail allow us to see different colors Rods allow us to see in dim light can not see fine spatial detail can not see different colors
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Receptive Fields and Rod vs. Cone Visual Acuity Cones—in the fovea, one cone often synapse onto only a single ganglion cell Rods—the axons of many rods synapse onto one ganglion cell This allows rods to be more sensitive in dim light, but it also reduces visual acuity
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Rods Cones
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Processing Visual Information Ganglion cells—neurons that connect to the bipolar cells, their axons form the optic nerve Bipolar cells—neurons that connect rods and cones to the ganglion cells Optic chiasm—point in the brain where the optic nerves from each eye meet and partly crossover to opposite sides of the brain
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Color Vision Our visual system interprets differences in the wavelength of light as color. Rods are color blind, but with the cones we can see different colors. This difference occurs because we have only one type of rod but three types of cones.
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Properties of Color Hue—property of wavelengths of light known as color; different wavelengths correspond to our subjective experience of color (hue) Saturation—property of color that corresponds to the purity of the light wave Brightness—perceived intensity of a color, corresponds to amplitude of the light wave.
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Color Mixing Two basic types of color mixing subtractive color mixture example: combining different color paints additive color mixture example: combining different color lights
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course PSY 101 taught by Professor N during the Spring '11 term at CUNY City Tech.

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Sensation and Perception Lecture for PSY 1001 - Sensation...

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