Cog~01&02VisPerc

Cog~01&02VisPerc - visual perception: the minds...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–16. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
visual perception : the mind’s interpretation of visual stimuli
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
In early stage of visual perception, objects are distinguished from background. This is usually not too difficult. One of several exceptions: an object looks like the background (camouflage )
Background image of page 2
Rubin face/vase illusion In figure-ground reversal , object and background can swap (figure roughly means object, and ground means background)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
M. C. Escher (1898-1972) Another instance of figure-ground reversal.
Background image of page 4
Do you see an object in the background?
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Once an object is located, it must be recognized. Object recognition is aided by multiple processes. Demo. Prepare to read the words that briefly appear in the box below. Here is what you saw:
Background image of page 6
Preceding example demonstrates two kinds of perceptual processes: bottom-up processes rely on the stimulus The letter between C and T looks like a cross between A or H. top-down processes rely on expectations (which depend on knowledge) The letter between C and T cannot be an H. These two kinds of processes work in concert.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The “THE CAT” demo is an illustration of one kind of context effect perception of stimulus is affected by surrounding stimuli Examples EGG = EGG Obscured text FUN = FUN EAT = ? Sloppy handwriting What letter is this?
Background image of page 8
More context effects Radenig snetneecs taht ilcndue wrdos wtih rarergaend lteerts is psobslie if the frsit and lsat ltretes are not mvoed.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
More context effects: An excerpt from a magazine ad: L ke y ur b ain, the n w L nd Rov r autom tic ly adj sts to anyth ng. Who is standing behind Bill Clinton?
Background image of page 10
Another context effect: Experiment Ss saw underlined letter that appeared alone or as part of word . K DARK Letter and word presented very briefly, and Ss tried to name the letter. Result: Accuracy was greater when letter appeared as part of a word. This is the word superiority effect . (Reicher, 1969)
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Another context effect: Experiment Ss listened to audiotape of sentences with missing phoneme. Sample Stimuli The *eel was on the axle. The *eel was on the shoe. After each sentence, Ss repeated what they heard. Results: Ss “replaced” appropriate phoneme. Sample Responses The wheel was on the axle. The heel was on the shoe. This occurred even though missing phoneme preceded contextual cue. This is the phonemic restoration effect . (Warren, 1970)
Background image of page 12
Object recognition is sometimes aided by light and shadow. Example. Which dimples appear to be raised toward you? Why? Light usually shines from above. (image from O’Reilly www.oreilly.de/catalog/9780596007799/toc.html )
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Object recognition is sometimes aided by motion. Example from Donald D. Hoffman www.cogsci.uci.edu/~ddhoff/Sphere3.html Example from Michael Bach michaelbach.de/ot/mot_biomot/index.html Elaborate Example from Nicholas Troje www.biomotionlab.ca/Demos/BMLwalker.html (G. Johansson, 1973)
Background image of page 14
Once an object recognized, the mind tries to determine how far away it is. To do so, the mind relies on depth cues
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 16
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course PSY 101 taught by Professor N during the Spring '11 term at CUNY City Tech.

Page1 / 77

Cog~01&02VisPerc - visual perception: the minds...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 16. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online