13-communication[2]

13-communication[2] - Communication unit Note: youre...

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Unformatted text preview: Communication unit Note: youre responsible for learning all of this material, even though I wont be directly lecturing on everything in these slides. So, take a look through these and use the textbook. Post questions on the course discussion board for topics youre confused about, and Ill focus on those in lecture on Monday (May 5). If a root cell has a water potential of 1.67MPa, and the soil has a water potential of -1.75MPa, what will happen? 1. Water will enter the root cells 2. Water will leave the root cells 3. Water will not net move into or out of the root cells Welcome back! Today well Finish osmoregulation Start our inter-cellular communication unit Lab Lab exam today/Tuesday You must take the exam in the section youre registered for Lecture exam Wednesday May 7 Covers all of respiration, osmoregulation, and inter-cell communication Scheduling Lecture on Wednesday is cancelled ALL labs this week are occurring as-scheduled The book covers this material very well The reading list is online (as its always been) Take a look at my slides to see what youll need to know from the unit. ut what do plants do when soil water potentials are very negative? Many die Often this is planned; annuals intentionally avoid dry periods by growing only when it is wet Many stop growing and/or abscise leaves, fruits, flowers, etc. Just wait until more water is present But some thrive in salty conditions Often by sequestering osmolytes in vacuoles, thus making their cells water potential more negative Halophytes typically absorb sodium and transport it to vacuoles in their leaf cells Amino acid proline is usually accumulated as well, since its less toxic than Na+ Some plants have salt glands The exact same idea as birds Secrete salt onto the surface of their leaves to remove excess salt Reduces danger of Na+ poisoning Some also use these salt secretions to create a very negative water potential on their leaf surfaces to help with water transport from the roots E.g. Atriplex halimus , salt bush Image source: http://www3.cibnor.mx/conserv/mangrove/iamaz2.html Black mangrove salt gland secretions Which kingdom are the most salt- tolerant species found in? 1. Protista 2. Animalia 3. Archaea 4. Bacteria 5. Plantae he award for best halophile goes to Halobacterium salinarum (Archaea, Euryarchaeota) Habitat: Salterns (salt-producing facilities) Minimum tolerated: 15% Optimum conditions: 25% Maximum tolerated: 32% (a saturated solution) Archaea and Bacteria have the most species capable of living in harsh osmotic conditions How do bacteria do it?...
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13-communication[2] - Communication unit Note: youre...

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