Oxidation-Reduction Reactions[1]

Oxidation-Reduction Reactions[1] - CHAPTER 20 CHAPTER...

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CHAPTER 20 CHAPTER 20 Oxidation-Reduction Reactions” Oxidation-Reduction Reactions” LEO SAYS GER Pre-AP Chemistry Charles Page High School Stephen L. Cotton
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Section 20.1 Section 20.1 The Meaning of Oxidation and The Meaning of Oxidation and Reduction (Redox) Reduction (Redox) OBJECTIVES Define oxidation and reduction in terms of the loss or gain of oxygen, and the loss or gain of electrons.
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Section 20.1 Section 20.1 The Meaning of Oxidation and The Meaning of Oxidation and Reduction (Redox) Reduction (Redox) OBJECTIVES State the characteristics of a redox reaction and identify the oxidizing agent and reducing agent.
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Section 20.1 Section 20.1 The Meaning of Oxidation and The Meaning of Oxidation and Reduction (Redox) Reduction (Redox) OBJECTIVES Describe what happens to iron when it corrodes.
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Oxidation and Reduction (Redox) Oxidation and Reduction (Redox) Early chemists saw “ oxidation reactions only as the combination of a material with oxygen to produce an oxide. For example, when methane burns in air, it oxidizes and forms oxides of carbon and hydrogen, as shown in Fig. 20.1, p. 631
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Oxidation and Reduction (Redox) Oxidation and Reduction (Redox) But, not all oxidation processes that use oxygen involve burning: Elemental iron slowly oxidizes to compounds such as iron (III) oxide, commonly called “rust” Bleaching stains in fabrics Hydrogen peroxide also releases oxygen when it decomposes
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Oxidation and Reduction (Redox) Oxidation and Reduction (Redox) A process called “ reduction ” is the opposite of oxidation, and originally meant the loss of oxygen from a compound Oxidation and reduction always occur simultaneously The substance gaining oxygen (or losing electrons) is oxidized , while the substance losing oxygen (or gaining electrons) is reduced .
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Oxidation and Reduction (Redox) Oxidation and Reduction (Redox) Today, many of these reactions may not even involve oxygen Redox currently says that electrons are transferred between reactants Mg + S → Mg 2+ + S 2- The magnesium atom changes to a magnesium ion by losing 2 electrons, and is thus oxidized The sulfur atom is changed to a sulfide ion by gaining 2 electrons, and is thus reduced.
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Oxidation and Reduction (Redox) Oxidation and Reduction (Redox) 1 1 2 0 0 2 2 - + + Cl Na Cl Na Each sodium atom loses one electron: Each chlorine atom gains one electron: - + + e Na Na 1 0 1 0 - - + Cl e Cl
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LEO says GER : LEO says GER : - + + e Na Na 1 0 L ose E lectrons = O xidation Sodium is oxidized G ain E lectrons = R eduction 1 0 - - + Cl e Cl Chlorine is reduced
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LEO says GER : LEO says GER : - Losing electrons is oxidation, and the
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Oxidation-Reduction Reactions[1] - CHAPTER 20 CHAPTER...

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