sigfig - SIGNIFICANT FIGURES The following rules will be...

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SIGNIFICANT FIGURES The following rules will be used to determine the number of significant figures in a measured or calculated number. 1. All nonzero digits are always significant. examples: 1.23 (3 s.f.) ; 1567 (4 s.f.) 2. Zeros between nonzero digits are always significant. examples: .17009 (5 s.f.) ; 6.008 (4 s.f.) ; 3405 (4 s.f.) 3. Leading zeros ( zeros to the left of the first nonzero digit ) are never significant. examples: .00987 (3 s.f.) ; 0.00001234 ( 4 s.f.) 4. Trailing zeros ( zeros to the right of the last nonzero digit) in a number with a decimal point will always be counted as significant examples: 345.980 (6 s.f.) ; .12300 (5 s.f.) ; 0.000 9800 ( 4 s.f.) 5.1 Trailing zeros in a number without a decimal point generally will not be significant. examples: 2000 (1 s.f.) ; 101200 (4 s.f.) 5.2 If one or more of the trailing zeroes are significant, then it is best to convert the number to scientific notation and include only the significant zeroes. Remember, every digit included in a number written in scientific notation is considered to be significant. Consider the following possibilities for the number 109000
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This note was uploaded on 11/13/2011 for the course CHEM 1b taught by Professor Cabrera during the Spring '10 term at San Jose City College.

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sigfig - SIGNIFICANT FIGURES The following rules will be...

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