PD71 Development and analysis of a novel vertical axis wind turbine

PD71 Development and analysis of a novel vertical axis wind turbine

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Development and Analysis of a Novel Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Paul Cooper and Oliver Kennedy School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, AUSTRALIA E-mail: pcooper@uow.edu.au Abstract This paper describes the development of a novel vertical axis wind turbine used for teaching and research purposes. The device is designed to operate at low tip speed ratios and features blades that are symmetric about the mid-chord plane. The blades are actively pitched by means of a mechanical system so that the chord of each blade rotates by 180º for every revolution of the main rotor. One of the attractions of the device is that it is self-starting and produces relatively high torque. A multiple streamtube analysis of the device has been developed and numerical predictions for the performance of the device are presented. Commissioning and field tests of a prototype are described and some preliminary performance results are presented and discussed. 1.INTRODUCTION Wind energy is rapidly emerging as one of the most cost-effective forms of renewable energy with very significant increases in annual installed capacity being reported around the world. The favoured form of turbines used for electricity generation purposes is the Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) with low solidity ratio (ratio of blade area to swept area) and high tip speed ratio, λ = R / V wind, where R is the radius of the blades and V wind is the wind velocity. This type of turbine has a high efficiency or coefficient of performance, C p, but relatively low torque. By contrast, the traditional “American Windmill” or “Southern Cross”, used throughout Australia and the USA for water pumping purposes, is a high solidity, low tip speed ratio device that produces a high torque suitable for direct drive of relatively simple mechanical pump systems. The second major group of wind turbine types are the Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs). A wide variety of VAWT configurations have been proposed, dating from the Persian VAWTs used for milling grain over a thousand years ago, through to the Darrieus turbine, invented in 1926 by Georges Darrieus, which has been used extensively for power generation. In fact one of the largest turbines ever built was the 96m high 64m diameter Éole Darrieus built near, Quebec, Canada, with a rated power output of 3.8MW and a rotor weighing 100tonnes. Other VAWT configurations include the Savonius VAWT, which is popular because of the simplicity of manufacture, and the straight bladed VAWTs. The latter include the Musgrove turbine that was developed culminating in successful testing of a 500kW device at Carmarthen Bay in the UK (Peace, 2004). In Australia, Kirke (1998) reported on his extensive testing and analysis of a number of “giromill”
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This note was uploaded on 11/13/2011 for the course AEE 495 taught by Professor O.uzol during the Spring '11 term at Middle East Technical University.

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PD71 Development and analysis of a novel vertical axis wind turbine

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