Lecture 5 - CHIRALITY A chiral object has a...

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CHIRALITY A chiral object has a non-superimposible mirror image (your hands!) Molecules that have non-superimposible mirror images are chiral - and termed enantiomers Properties of enantiomers: Same melting point, boiling point, solubility etc…… BUT they interact with plane polarized light in different ways! What is plane polarized light? Recall that regular light is composed of waves oscillating in all directions perpendicular to the direction of propagation. When these oscillating waves are restricted to a single plane (direction) by filtration the light is referred to as plane polarized In 1815 Jean Baptiste Biot discovered that some naturally occurring organic molecules rotate this plane of polarization - attributed this to some asymmetry or chirality in the molecule. If light is rotated clockwise = dextrorotatory ( d ) or (+). If light is rotated counterclockwise = levorotatory ( l ) or (-). We will see that the direction that light is rotated has nothing to do with R or S nomenclature!
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Lecture 5 - CHIRALITY A chiral object has a...

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