kendall7e_im_ch14 - Chapter 14 Systems Analysis and Design...

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Chapter 14 Systems Analysis and Design Instructor's Manual 14-1 1 Chapter 14 Human-Computer Interaction Key Points and Objectives 1. The concept of designing for HCI is to try to ensure system functionality and usability, to providing effective user interaction support, and to enhancing a pleasant user experience. 2. The overarching goal of HCI is to achieve both organizational and individual user effectiveness and efficiency. 3. To reach HCI goals, managers and developers need to be knowledgeable about the interplay among users, tasks, task contexts, information technology (IT), and the environments in which systems are used. 4. It is important that the fit among the user, computer, and task all correspond. 5. The analyst should try to make the best possible use of people in designing a computerized task intended to meet an organizational objective. Better fit results in better performance and greater overall well-being for the human involved in the system. Better fit is meant to result in better performance and greater overall well-being for the human involved in the system. 6. Well-being is a concern for a human’s overall comfort, safety, and health; it is their physical as well as psychological state. 7. How users feel about themselves, their identities, their work life, and performance can all be gauged through assessing their attitudes. 8. The technology acceptance model (TAM) is a way for analysts to organize their thinking about whether users will accept and use information technology. 9. The technology acceptance model can be used to shape training after a system has been developed, but it can also be used early in the development process to garner user reactions to prototypes so that systems can be changed early on in the development process to increase the likelihood of their adoption and use. 10. Usability standards cover the use of the product (effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction in a particular context of use), the user interface and interaction, the process used to develop the product, and the capability of an organization to apply user-centered design. 11. There are 11 usability heuristics: A. Visibility of system status B. Match between the system and the real world C. User control and freedom D. Consistency and standards E. Error prevention
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Chapter 14 Human-Computer Interaction 14-2 F. Reconnection rather than recall G. Flexibility and efficiency of use H. Aesthetic and minimalist design I. Help that users recognize J. Diagnosis and recovery from errors K. Help and documentation 12. One important consideration is that data, particularly data used for decision making, are made available in different forms so that users with different cognitive abilities can make sense of them. 13.
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kendall7e_im_ch14 - Chapter 14 Systems Analysis and Design...

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