Description of Pennsylvania by William Penn, 1681, in Albert Cook Myers,ed., Narratives of Early Pen

Description of Pennsylvania by William Penn, 1681, in Albert Cook Myers,ed., Narratives of Early Pen

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Description of Pennsylvania by William Penn, 1681, in Albert Cook Myers, ed., Narratives of Early Pennsylvania, West Jersey, and Delaware 1630– 1707 (New York, 1912). In 1681, King Charles II awarded William Penn a charter for the North American territory that would become Pennsylvania. Penn named this colony after his father, who had served in the English Navy. Penn was a member of the Society of Friends, or Quakers, a Protestant denomination that faced persecution from more traditional Protestants, as well as others, in both England and the other colonies. As a result, freedom from persecution was a cornerstone of the government he established for the colony. Penn was the sole proprietor of the colony, and in order to turn a profit through the sale of land, he had to attract settlers. He did so through appeals to the English, Irish, and the inhabitants of the German states, such as the one excerpted below. Since (by the good providence of God) a Country in America is fallen to my lot, I thought it not less my Duty
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course MATH 201 taught by Professor Doolittle during the Spring '11 term at Hawaii.

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