John White, Letter to Richard Hakluyt and Description of Voyage to The Lost Colony (1590)

John White, Letter to Richard Hakluyt and Description of Voyage to The Lost Colony (1590)

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John White, Letter to Richard Hakluyt and Descpription of Voyage to The Lost Colony (1590) John White, an English explorer who served as the first governor of Raleigh's colony at Roanoke Island, left Roanoke in the fall of 1587 to obtain supplies for the struggling colony. Unable to return until 1590 due to difficulties with both the French and Spanish, he found that little remained of his colony. His account of his return voyage to Roanoke Island (now Manteo, North Carolina) appears below. To the Worshipful and my very friend Master Richard Hakluyt, much happinesse in the Lord. SIR, as well for the satisfying of your earnest request, as the performance of my promise made unto you at my last being with you in England, I have sent you (although in a homely stile, especially for the contentation of a delicate eare) the true discourse of my last voyage into the West Indies, and partes of America called Virginia, taken in hand about the end of Februarie, in the yeare of our redemption 1590. And what events happened unto us in this our journey, you shall plainely perceive by the sequele of my discourse. There were at the time aforesaid three ships absolutely determined to goe for the West Indies, at the speciall charges of M. John Wattes of London Marchant. But when they were fully furnished, and in readinesse to make their departure, a generall stay was commanded of all ships thorowout England. Which so soone as I heard, I presently (as I thought it most requisite) acquainted Sir Walter Ralegh therewith, desiring him that as I had sundry times afore bene chargeable and troublesome unto him, for the supplies and reliefes of the planters in Virginia: so likewise, that by his endevour it would please him at that instant to procure license for those three ships to proceede on with their determined voyage, that thereby the people in Virginia (if it were Gods pleasure) might speedily be comforted and relieved without further charges unto him. Whereupon he by his good meanes obtained license of the Queenes Majestie, and order to be taken, that the owner of the 3 ships should be bound unto Sir Walter Ralegh or his assignes, in 3000 pounds, that those 3 ships in consideration of their releasement should take in, and transport a convenient number of passengers, with their furnitures and necessaries to be landed in Virginia. Neverthelesse that order was not observed, neither was the bond taken according to the intention aforesaid. But rather in contempt of the aforesaid order, I was by the owner and Commanders of the ships denied to have any passengers, or any thing els transported in any of the said ships, saving only my selfe and my chest; no not so much as a boy to attend upon me, although I made great sute, and earnest intreatie aswell to the chiefe Commanders, as to the owner of the said ships. Which crosse and unkind dealing, although it very much discontented me, notwithstanding the scarsity of time was such, that I could have no opportunity to go unto Sir Walter Ralegh with complaint: for the ships being then all in
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course MATH 201 taught by Professor Doolittle during the Spring '11 term at Hawaii.

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John White, Letter to Richard Hakluyt and Description of Voyage to The Lost Colony (1590)

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