Jan 31 2011 - Assignment 3 In the USGS Minerals Commodity...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Assignment 3 In the USGS Minerals Commodity Summary of 2011 for Molybdenum, the following production facts are presented (in units of metric tons): 2009 2010 Mine production Reserves United States 47,800 56,000 2,700,000 Armenia 4,150 4,200 200,000 Canada 8,840 9,100 200,000 Chile 34,900 39,000 1,100,000 China 93,500 94,000 4,300,000 Iran 3,700 3,700 50,000 Kazakhstan 380 400 130,000 Kyrgyzstan 250 250 100,000 Mexico 7,800 8,000 130,000 Mongolia 3,000 3,000 160,000 Peru 12,300 12,000 450,000 Russia e 3,800 3,800 250,000 Uzbekistan e 550 550 60,000 World total (rounded) 221,000 234,000 9,800,000 And the conclusion is reached that …[t]because of the availability and versatility of molybdenum, industry has sought to develop new materials that benefit from the alloying properties of the metal. Elsewhere (http://www.roskill.com/reports/steel-alloys/molybdenum) there is a graph presentation of data 1) Are the two data sets datasets consistent and what is likely responsible for the trend over time?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2) The USGS goes on to say “ because of the availability and versatility of molybdenum, industry has sought to develop new materials that benefit from the alloying properties of the metal
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course EMSE 335 taught by Professor Cawley during the Spring '11 term at Case Western.

Page1 / 5

Jan 31 2011 - Assignment 3 In the USGS Minerals Commodity...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online