Class 2 - Class 2 Safety, Environment, Health, and Ethics...

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Class 2 Safety, Environment, Health, and Ethics
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One goal of chemical engineers is to produce goods and services that enhance the quality of life. Chemical engineers have been at the forefront of efforts to improve: Health (e.g. pharmaceuticals) Safety (e.g. shatter-proof polymer glass) Environment (e.g. catalytic converters)
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Safety
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Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) “each employer shall furnish to each of his (her) employees employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his (her) employees” How do you interpret this?
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Standard Interpretation An employer must avoid exposing employees to hazards that should have been known to the employer, whether or not that hazard is specifically regulated by OSHA. Thus, the responsibility of researching the literature to see if anyone has identified a hazard is placed on the employer. Most chemical engineers are employees, yet often represent the employer and, therefore, assume the responsibilities under the general duty clause.
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Hazard Communication Standard (HazCom) The Worker Right to Know Requires the employer to train all employees so that the employees understand the hazards of the substances that they are handling, exposed to, or potentially exposed to - Training - Proper Labeling of Containers - Availability of Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
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Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) 1. Materials Identification 2. Ingredients and Hazards 3. Physical Data 5. Reactivity Data 6. Health Hazard Information 7. Spill, Leak, and Disposal Procedures 8. Special Protection Information 9. Special Precautions and Contents
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Process Safety Management 1. Employee Participation 3. Process Hazards Analysis 4. Operating Procedures 5. Training 6. Contractors 7. Pre-Startup Safety Review 8. Mechanical Integrity 9. Hot work Permit 10.Management of Change 11.Incident Investigation 13.Compliance Safety Audit
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Major Safety Incidents
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Bhopal The Bhopal Disaster took place in the early hours of the morning of December 3 , 1984 , in the heart of the city of Bhopal , India . A Union Carbide subsidiary pesticide plant released 40 tonnes of methyl isocyanate (MIC) gas, immediately killing nearly 3,000 people and ultimately causing at least 15,000 to 22,000 total deaths. Bhopal is frequently cited as the world's worst industrial disaster .
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course CHEN 4520 taught by Professor Wiemer during the Fall '11 term at Colorado.

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Class 2 - Class 2 Safety, Environment, Health, and Ethics...

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