ECE_3820_lecture_19_2011

ECE_3820_lecture_19_2011 - Today (11/03), lecture #19 1)...

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Today (11/03), lecture #19 1) Quiz #8 2) The cardiovascular system Tuesday (11/08), lecture #20 Finish the cardiovascular system Thursday (11/10), Exam #2 Bring your calculator. Material to study: A) All lecture notes (lectures 12-20). Study the slides and the notes that were written on the board. B) All concepts addressed in homework sets 4, 5, and 6. HW Set #6 : The answers are available on Blackboard.
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Hint for Problem 5 of Hw Set #5 k g j y y x a i xy x a k z P j y P i x P P ˆ ˆ ) ( 2 ˆ ) ( 2 ˆ ˆ ˆ 3 2 2 2 3 2 ρ + + = + + = dt dV z V y V x V x P g x x x x x µ = + + + 2 2 2 2 2 2 dt dV z V y V x V y P g y y y y y = + + + 2 2 2 2 2 2 dt dV z V y V x V z P g z z z z z = + + + 2 2 2 2 2 2 Use the Navier-Stokes equations for Cartesian coordinates z V V y V V x V V t V dt V d z y x + + + = And the derivative of the velocity field To write the pressure gradient field
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The homogeneity of flowing blood is dependent upon vessel diameter . 1) In large vessels pulsatile flow keeps blood cells suspended and blood can be approximated as a homogeneous fluid. 2) In smaller vessels the erythrocytes move to the center, leaving a plasma layer near the wall. 3) In capillaries the erythrocytes squeeze through the lumen one at a time, thereby isolating the plasma into separate units between the erythrocytes. Blood is a suspension of multiple components and is not always considered to be a homogeneous fluid. Homogeneous Inhomogeneous
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Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect : the viscosity of blood moving in a small vessel is related to the vessel diameter. Erythrocytes become concentrated at the center of the vessel during laminar flow. Large velocity gradient near the wall pulls the long axis of erythrocytes parallel to the direction of flow and forces them toward the center where the flow is more stable.
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course ECE 3820 taught by Professor Wang during the Fall '11 term at GWU.

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ECE_3820_lecture_19_2011 - Today (11/03), lecture #19 1)...

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