Pulm-funct-1

Pulm-funct-1 - BIOPAC lab: Pulmonary Function I Pulmonary...

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BIOPAC lab: Pulmonary Function I V1.5 1 Pulmonary Function I (modified by C. S. Tritt, April 10, 2006) Volumes and Capacities I. Introduction The volume of air a person inhales (inspires) and exhales (expires) can be measured with a spirometer (spiro = breath, meter = to measure). A bell spirometer consists of a double- walled cylinder in which an inverted bell filled with oxygen-enriched air is immersed in water to form a seal. A pulley attaches the bell to a recording pen that writes on a drum rotating at a constant speed. During inspiration, air is removed from the bell and the pen rises, recording an inspired volume. As expired air enters the bell, the pen falls and the expired volume is recorded. The resultant record of volume change vs. time is called a spirogram. In this lesson, you will use an airflow transducer and the software will convert airflow to volume, thus approximating the volume reading of a spirometer. This is a much quicker method of obtaining lung capacity data, however, the disadvantage is that the recording procedure must be followed exactly for an accurate conversion of airflow to volume.
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BIOPAC lab: Pulmonary Function I V1.5 2 There are four non-overlapping primary compartments of total lung capacity: 1. Tidal volume (TV) is the volume of air inspired or expired during a single breath. When a resting person breathes normally, tidal volume is approximately 500 ml. During exercise, tidal volume can be more than 3 liters. 2 . Inspiratory reserve volume (IRV) is the volume or air that can be maximally inhaled at the end of a tidal inspiration. Resting IRV is approximately 3300 ml in young adult males and 1900 ml in young adult females. 3 . Expiratory reserve volume (ERV) is the volume of air that can be maximally exhaled at the end of a tidal respiration. Resting ERV is approximately 1000 ml in young adult males and 700 ml in young adult females. 4 . Residual volume (RV) is the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of a maximal expiration. In contrast to IRV, TV and ERV, residual volume does not change with exercise. Use the following equations (originally from Crapo, 1981; obtained from the Medal website) for the residual volume (in ml) RV = 19.7 * (height in cm) + 20.1 * (age in years) 2421 (for males) and RV = 21.6 * (height in cm) + 20.7 * (age in years) 2840 (for females). Residual volume reflects the fact that after the first breath at birth inflates the lungs, they are never completely emptied during any subsequent respiratory
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course ECE 3820 taught by Professor Wang during the Fall '11 term at GWU.

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Pulm-funct-1 - BIOPAC lab: Pulmonary Function I Pulmonary...

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