week9_Lung_Capacity_Section30_Group 1_and_4

week9_Lung_Capacity_Section30_Group 1_and_4 - ECE 3280...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
ECE 3280 Principles and Practice of Biomedical Engineering Laboratory Lab #9 Lung Function Experiment Section 30, Group 1 and 4 Berk Bozoklar (20%) Felipe Zambrano (20%) Keith Oldano (20%) Joshua Dean (20%) Stefan Herrerra (20%) Conducted October 28 th 2011 Submitted November 4 th 2011 Abstract: An airflow transducer is used to measure the patterns of airflow while a subject is breathing. The lab’s purpose was to determine the Tidal, Inspiratory Reserve (IRV), and Expiratory Reserve (ERV) volumes using the airflow transducer. To complete this objective, the subject was told to take five normal inspiratory and expiratory breaths as a way to establish a consistent tidal volume, with one large inspiratory breath from which IRV could be measured and one large expiratory breath from which ERV could be measured. From these recorded measurements, we were able to calculate the expiratory, inspiratory, and vital capacities of the subject by implementing a set of equations. The acquired values were compared with the known averages for each volume based on the subject’s
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
gender, age, and height. As a result, the predicted vital capacity of 5.469L was determined and the observed vital capacity was 5.4L, which is 92.32% of the predicted vital capacity. In addition, our result fell within the 80% tolerance range; therefore, it is considered a normal vital capacity. The values and observations recorded from the lab could be expanded by other groups researching pulmonary volumes as a continuation. Introduction: Figure - Respiratory Volumes and Capacities Table - Average volumes for young adult males and females at rest Gender Tidal Volume Inspiratory Reserve Volume Expiratory Reserve Volume Male 500ml 3300ml 1000ml Female 500ml 1900ml 700ml Table 1 shows the average Tidal, Inspiratory Reserve, and Expiratory Reserve Volumes; while Figure 1 shows the graph of Respiratory Volumes and Capacities. There are four primary compartments of the total lung capacity: tidal volume, inspiratory reserve volume, expiratory reserve volume, and residual volume. Tidal volume is the volume of inspired and expired air during one breath
Background image of page 2
cycle with an average volume of around 500mL. Once the tidal volume reaches the lower end, the maximum amount of air that can be exhaled is the expiratory reserve volume, which has an average volume of about 1000mL. The high point of the resting tidal volume is the amount of air that can be maximally inhaled above the resting tidal volume is called the inspiratory reserve volume. Gender plays a role in the inspiratory reserve volumes as it is different between males and females. This is because male lungs are larger than female lung.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course ECE 3820 taught by Professor Wang during the Fall '11 term at GWU.

Page1 / 6

week9_Lung_Capacity_Section30_Group 1_and_4 - ECE 3280...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online