africa print slides colonialism

africa print slides colonialism - Payoffs to production vs....

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Payoffs to production vs. predation Everybody else a predator Everybody else a producer Predator Stable subsistence income Unstable Producer Unstable Stable high income Your choice Everybody else’s choice One more assumption: Some weak punishment of predators, and punishment of predators more likely the higher the ratio of producers to predators.
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How colonialism created autocracy The colonial state itself was “absolutist and bureaucratic”, run from London, Paris, and Lisbon (Fieldhouse p. 55) Many pre-colonial African societies were ‘stateless’ or had village self-government (e.g. Igbo of Nigeria) or were loose confederations (Akan of Ghana). Others were conquest states (Zulu) (Mamdani pp. 47- 49) The colonialists drew on African traditions of decentralized power, but gave absolute power to decentralized chiefs (Mamdani)
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Chief power (Mamdani Ch. 2) Had his own police force, judiciary, rights to compel forced labor, tax collection for colonial authorities Collected more taxes than were due, kept rest to himself (a German missionary in Tanganyika estimated ratio as 7:1) Later colonial power paid chiefs salaries but abuses continued Only check on chief was that colonial power could replace him.
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Colonizers invented chiefs where there had been none before “Most administrators knew that many peoples had no chiefs.” (1930 memo in Tanganyika) To administer indirect rule, people had to belong to “tribes” headed by “chiefs” “To install a state apparatus among communities whose lives had never before been shaped by one was literally to invent tribes!” (Mamdani, p. 79) E.g. Ndebele in Zimbabwe were a loose conglomeration of peoples with a “state of anarchy”, not an ethnic group. British taught the Ndebele how to be proper Ndebele by promulgating a “native code” and appointing a chief.
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Legacy at independence Native Authority chief was replaced by single party cadre, who behaved much like decentralized despots. For example, in Tanzania after
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course ECON GA.3001.1. taught by Professor Williameasterly during the Fall '11 term at NYU.

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africa print slides colonialism - Payoffs to production vs....

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