blwm_managers_mtg

blwm_managers_mtg - Introduction Geographic Information...

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Unformatted text preview: Introduction Geographic Information Technology Introduction Topics: What is Geographic Information Technology (GIT)? What are its benefits? The Organizational Structure of GIT within SCDHEC. How is Geographic Information Technology being used within the agency? Future Projects and Goals What is GIT? Geographic information technology is a interrelated group of technologies that allows people to collect, create, process and analyze geographical data and other related tabular data. Typically, these technologies are also used to create visual output of this information in the form of a map or related object. There are three major geographic information technologies employed within SCDHEC to collect and/or process geographic information: Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Remote Sensing (RS), and Global Positioning Systems (GPS). Each will be described in more detail. Other technologies, including Computer Aided Design (CAD), groundwater modeling software and database management systems such as EFIS, could also be incorporated into this group. What is GIT? Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are the most widely used geographic information technology. A GIS is a system of databases that each contain spatial information in addition to the normal data you might associate with a tabular record system. The spatial component of this data allows the user to analyze the data both statistically and geographically, alone or in conjunction with other spatial information, and produce output in the form of maps. New data layers, or new information, can be created using the tools available in a GIS. GIS systems are frequently the ultimate destination for much of the data created through other GITs, a fact which has led most people to call any geographical technology a GIS. What is GIT? Remote Sensing is a geographic information technology that uses various sensors to collect typically visual information about an area. Depending on the sensor used, the data collected can provide information about the location of objects, the physical makeup of objects, the health of vegetation, as well as the elevation of the objects. The data collected using remote sensing can be manipulated using remote sensing software and it can also be incorporated into GIS software for use in mapping. What is GIT? What is GIT? Global Positioning Systems are also a component of geographic information technology. Using satellites and triangulation, GPS units provide highly accurate locational information that can then be placed in a Geographic Information System (GIS) and associated with a particular feature such as a monitoring well or UST site. The agency has a variety of GPS units, some capable of collecting data accurate to within <1 ft. horizontally anywhere on the earth. Some units are also capable of collecting attribute information about the site during the time of point collection so that handwritten notes regarding the site are not needed, thereby reducing paperwork and errors. What are the benefits of GIT? The use of a shared server system and a strong SCDHEC GIS users group (SIGIS) promotes intra-Agency cooperation. This sharing also leads to a reduction in duplicative efforts by Bureaus all trying to achieve the same goals. A strong SC GIS users group, which includes other State Agencies as well as some limited private industries, fosters inter-Agency cooperation and again, less duplication of effort Provides seamless integration with many Federal Agencies such as FEMA, EPA and USGS who provide data in GIS formats Efficient investigation of site activities is provided when all the data sources are already in a standard data format rather than in a diverse set of databases. Staff is provided a more visual method to look at their projects and their data Analytical tools allow you to study the spatial inter-relationships at sites and between sites that would not be possible without GIT. This allows users to study current activities and relationships as well as plan for future activities. Organizational Structure of GIT within SCDHEC How is GIT being used within the BLWM? The Nuclear Response and Environmental Surveillance section uses Emergency Planning Zone and Grid Maps that combine spatial data from the Power Stations, SCDHEC and other sources to provide field teams and EOC staff with maps for navigation and evaluation of plume modeling results. The various sites also now use these DHEC maps for their drills. How is GIT being used within the BLWM? These maps produced for RCRA use a combination of historical and recent aerial photographs and current GIS layers (some developed using GPS) to help define the past and current extent of SWMUs at sites such as the NWS and the MCAS. In some instances, new SWMUs have been identified by photointerpretation of historic aerial photographs of the sites. How is GIT being used within the BLWM? This map produced for a Division of Site Assessment and Remediation project used a combination of contractor provided modeling data and CAD files, in conjunction with aerial photography, to produce site maps used during public awareness meetings. How is GIT being used within the BLWM? This map was produced for the Division of Mining and Solid Waste Management to aid in the permitting of new landfills and analyze the coverage areas of existing landfills. The underlying data was created using coordinates supplied on permits and through GPS point collection by SW staff. GIS was used to determine areas of overlap and areas not covered by existing LFs. How is GIT being used within the BLWM? This UST project used the modeling capabilities of GIS software to evaluate the relationship of petroleum product and groundwater in Marion, S.C.. Data layers included well information, contractor supplied CAD files and GIS baselayers. How is GIT being used within the BLWM? This Site Assessment and Remediation Division project involved using GPS collected sample locations in combination with other GIS layers such as scanned USGS Topographic Quadrangle maps, aerial photography, endangered species GIS layers, streams, surface water intakes and roads to produce maps in support of EPA and Superfund initiatives. Other projects for SAR have used GIS to estimate population around sites and determine what other sources of contamination may be present in the immediate area. How is GIT being used within the BLWM? The Pontiac Bombing Range project used historical aerial photography in combination with parcel data from Richland County, data layers from The Mungo Company and road files to aid in the response to the incident and provide the public with information. Future Projects & Goals Future Projects: Produce GIS applications that will function over the internet and the intranet Continue to provide access to GIS software to all interested personnel Provide training on ArcGIS software Develop hardcopy map booklets for District personnel Continue working on emergency response projects and facilitate integration with other similar efforts in PHISIS and EPD Goals: Integration with EFIS Expansion of the type of projects being generated Additional GIS staff ...
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blwm_managers_mtg - Introduction Geographic Information...

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