liberalism and identity 6

liberalism and identity 6 - Identity in the interwar years...

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Identity in the interwar years and the outbreak of World War II: Nationalism again became a flashpoint for conflict. Wilson’s 14 Points called for the self-determination peoples – the idea here is that each nation should govern itself in its own state. This theory applied only to Europe – colonies were denied this right. In the case of Europe, this led to a break-up of the Ottoman Empire and the Austro-Hungarian empire and the creation of new states, mostly in Eastern Europe. The idea here was the democracy would take hold in these states, thus insuring that national minorities would be protected from the majority. Thus, nations achieved the aspiration of statehood, but at the same time this would be a new flashpoint. National minorities existed in all of these newly independent states – many of them demanded to be allowed to join with their co- nationals in other states. New ideologies emerged during the interwar period: 1. Liberalism remained a major force, but a weakened one, particularly during the
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This note was uploaded on 11/16/2011 for the course POLISCI 1003 taught by Professor Olson during the Fall '11 term at GWU.

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liberalism and identity 6 - Identity in the interwar years...

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