The structure of the League of Nations itself

The structure of the League of Nations itself - The...

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The structure of the League of Nations itself: this would be the greatest problem of the League, in that many of the provisions of the organization did not take into account the “real-world” of international relations – in many ways, the League was too idealistic. 1. Principle of unanimity: all nations in the League had to agree on what constituted a threat to international peace. Established a principle of equality between states – regardless of size or power, all states had an equal voice in the League – the Great Powers had no special responsibilities or privileges. 2. The Council and the Assembly: The Council consisted of 9 members, and the Assembly consisted of all members of the League. In the Council, there were 5 permanent members (Britain, France, Italy, Japan, and the US – which never joined) but these permanent members had no special power or privilege. All members of the Council could exercise a veto power. Furthermore, all members of the Assembly had a veto power. No real distinction was made between the duties of the Council and the Assembly, and there was no hierarchy between the two. 3.
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The structure of the League of Nations itself - The...

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