Constructivism in Education

Constructivism in Education - Christopher O. Roman Intro 2...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Christopher O. Roman Intro 2 Education Paper # 3 Due: 4/6/2011 Constructivism in Education “Beeeeeeeeeeep” is the sound of the morning bell as a group of eleventh grade students from Swan High School enter their first period history class. As Mr. Reyes enters the room, he prompts the students to take out their notebooks and begins writing on the blackboard. After giving off a sigh of fatigue, Kate reaches for a notebook under her desk as she whispers, “Brilliant, here we go again.” Like Kate, many secondary school students (especially high school) are forced to endure such traditional and routine lessons taught by their teachers each day. This transmissionist method of teaching defines the teacher as the primary knowledge holder in the classroom, while the students are defined as sponges absorbing the teacher’s information. So, similar to Mr. Reyes, the teacher could spend the entire period writing notes on the board while the students copy them down, or the teacher could spend the entire period lecturing while the students do everything in their power to try and stay awake. Although this method of teaching is quite popular among most educators, the time has come to consider new methods of teaching where the students can become more involved in the classroom. Authors Deborah Meier, Eleanor Duckworth, and Brian D. Schultz each support a new method of teaching known as constructivism in their works titled, “Reinventing Teaching”, “The Having of Wonderful Ideas”, and “Spectacular Things Happen Along the Way” respectively. Constructivist teaching is more focused on the students as opposed to just the teacher. This, however, is a brief definition of one of the many aspects of constructivism. According to Meier, Duckworth, and Schultz, three important aspects of constructivist teaching are as follows: teacher-student
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 5

Constructivism in Education - Christopher O. Roman Intro 2...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online