Patterns_of_Inheritance

Patterns_of_Inheritance - Patterns of Inheritance About...

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Unformatted text preview: Patterns of Inheritance About Mendel Mendel grew up on his parents small farm in a region of Austria that is now part of the Czech Republic. In 1843, at the age of 21, Mendel entered an Augustinian monastery. Around 1857, Mendel began breeding garden peas in the abbey garden in order to study inheritance. Why Peas? They are available in many characters. A character is a heritable feature, such as flower color, that varies among individuals. Each variant for a character, such as purple or white color for flowers, is called a trait . One variety has purple flowers, while another variety has white flowers. Mendel could also strictly control which plants mated with which Mendels Experiment Menels Results Mendels Four Conclusions First, alternative versions of genes account for variations in inherited characters. (maternal and paternal) Two different traits for every character (now known to be controlled by alleles, different variations of a gene) Mendels Four Conclusions (cont) Second , for each character, an organism inherits two alleles, one from each parent. Third , if the two alleles at a locus differ, then one, the dominant allele , determines the organisms appearance; the other, the recessive allele , has no noticeable effect on the organisms appearance. Mendels Four Conclusions (cont) The fourth part of Mendel s model is the Law of Segregation States that the two alleles for a heritable character separate (segregate) during gamete formation and end up in different gametes. Do Mendels explanations make sense?Do Mendels explanations make sense?...
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Patterns_of_Inheritance - Patterns of Inheritance About...

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