CL17-DietarySelection

CL17-DietarySelection - ,andhow much November10,2011...

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Conditioning and Learning Dietary Selection – What to eat, and how  much November 10, 2011 © John M. Ackroff 2011
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 Dietary Selection Foraging for Macronutrients What Makes Foods Rewarding? How Can We Ask the Rats? Can We Trust Their First Answers? © John M. Ackroff 2011
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 Foraging for  Macronutrients Carbohydrates, proteins, fats Micronutrients – vitamins, minerals, etc. Free-feeding animals select a mix of  macronutrients. Mix can be adjusted for long-term needs Pregnancy / lactation Mix relatively insensitive to short-term need © John M. Ackroff 2011
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 Foraging – availability  Abundance vs. accessibility There might be many hard-to-catch prey There may be leaves that are out of reach There may be slow-moving prey, but only a  small number As autumn sets in, there are fewer and  fewer edible leaves © John M. Ackroff 2011
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 Foraging Instead of feeding animals standard  chow, give them access (separately) to  a source of carbohydrate (corn starch),  fat (Crisco), and protein (soybean  meal). Provide free access to water and  micronutrients © John M. Ackroff 2011
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 Foraging Equal opportunities to eat each type of  food. Vary cost (# bar presses) High cost lowers availability Fewer, larger meals of higher-cost  components Trade off fat and carb calories Protein works differently © John M. Ackroff 2011
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 Protein Fat and carbs just provide energy, so  are interchangeable Protein provides amino acids; it’s the  sole source. Protein dropped only at highest costs Smaller increases in size of protein meals Protein loads suppress subsequent intake  more than loads of other macronutrients © John M. Ackroff 2011
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 Comparing abundance and  availability Substitute casein (protein only) for  soybean meal (protein + some carbs) Train rats on a complete diet  21.6% of calories from protein 66.8% from carbs 11.6% from fat Move to 24/7 foraging cage © John M. Ackroff 2011
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 Abundance and  availability 
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CL17-DietarySelection - ,andhow much November10,2011...

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