National_Prison_Rape_Commission_Exec_Sum

National_Prison_Rape_Commission_Exec_Sum - EXECUTIVE...

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Unformatted text preview: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY JUNE 2009 -- Commissioners Reggie B. Walton, Chair John A. Kaneb, Vice Chair James E. Aiken Jamie Fellner Pat Nolan Gustavus A. Puryear IV Brenda V. Smith Cindy Struckman Johnson References for quotations and other source materials mentioned in this executive summary are provided in the Commission’s full report . E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y 1 Executive Summary R ape is violent, destructive, and a crime—no less so when the vic- tim is incarcerated. Until recently, however, the public viewed sexual abuse as an inevitable feature of confinement. Even as courts and human rights standards increasingly confirmed that prisoners have the same fundamental rights to safety, dignity, and justice as individuals living at liberty in the community, vulnerable men, women, and children continued to be sexually victimized by other prisoners and corrections staff. Tolerance of sexual abuse of prisoners in the govern- ment’s custody is totally incompatible with American values. Congress affirmed the duty to protect incarcerated individuals from sexual abuse by unanimously enacting the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003. The Act called for the creation of a national Commission to study the causes and consequences of sexual abuse in confinement and to develop standards for correctional facilities nationwide that would set in motion a process once considered impossible: the elimination of prison rape. This executive summary briefly discusses the Commission’s nine findings on the problems of sexual abuse in confinement and select poli- cies and practices that must be mandatory everywhere to remedy these problems. It also covers recommendations about what leaders in govern- ment outside the corrections profession can do to support solutions. The findings are discussed in detail and thoroughly cited in the body of the report, where readers will also find information about all of the Commis- sion’s standards. Full text of the standards is included as an appendix to the report. In the years leading up to the passage of PREA and since then, corrections leaders and their staff have developed and implemented poli- cies and practices to begin to prevent sexual abuse and also to better re- spond to victims and hold perpetrators accountable when prevention fails. They have been aided by a range of robust Federal initiatives, support from professional corrections associations, and advocates who have vo- cally condemned sexual abuse in confinement. The landscape is changing. Training curricula for corrections staff across the country now include information about sexual abuse in confinement and how to prevent it. Sexual abuse is “not part of the penalty that criminal offenders pay for their offenses against society.” —U.S. Supreme Court N AT I O N A L P R I S O N R A P E E L I M I N AT I O N C O M M I S S I O N R E P O R T 2 Some agencies and facilities have formed sexual assault response teams to revolutionize their responses to sexual abuse. Despite these and other to revolutionize their responses to sexual abuse....
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This note was uploaded on 11/15/2011 for the course CJ 471 taught by Professor Christophersmith during the Fall '10 term at Michigan State University.

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National_Prison_Rape_Commission_Exec_Sum - EXECUTIVE...

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