Physics in Guitar - This creates an electric field that,...

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And all that that implies Physics in Guitar
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For a guitar to produce a sound, you first need to get the strings set up correctly, using this formula (whether you know it or not) Without physics, guitars would produce no sound! Oh NO! where f = fundamental frequency L = string length between fixed points (i.e. bridge and nut) T = string tension P = string mass per unit length SOOO
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String Guage (the width of the string) Frequency String Mass per Unit Length Tension Inch/mm Cycles/sec kg/m kg f P T E, or 1st .010/.254 329.63 .401 7.28 B, or 2nd .013/.330 246.94 .708 7.22 G, or 3rd .017/.432 196.00 1.140 7.32 D, or 4th .026/.660 146.82 2.333 8.41 A, or 5th .036/.914 110.00 4.466 9.03 E, or 6th .046/1.168 82.407 6.790 7.71 TOTAL kg of tension on neck 46.96 Final Tension of Strings (using the equation from the previous slide)
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Once you've got those set up properly, you're ready to begin transmitting frequencies to your pickups! The Copper wire is coiled around a fixed point and placed near a magnet.
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Unformatted text preview: This creates an electric field that, when disturbed by the frequencies created when the strings are strummed, changes the magnetic flux. This will induce a voltage in the wire. Inductance, DC resistance and Distributed Capacitance Inductance is what determines how easily and loudly the string’s frequency is picked up. Inductance is measured in Henries and ranges from 1-9 Henries depending on the number of turns in the copper wire as well as the shape of the pickup. Capitance (phenomenon where electric charge is stored) occurs parallel to the induction coils and developes between tiny spaces in the coils. DC Resistance is measured in Ohms and depends on the diameter of the copper wire used. (usually amounting to between 1000 and 15000 Ohms) This diagram displays how, when the magnetic field is disturbed, the frequency is picked up. thus: “Pickups”...
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This note was uploaded on 11/15/2011 for the course ENGLISH ENC1105 taught by Professor Johnsmith during the Spring '11 term at Harrison College.

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Physics in Guitar - This creates an electric field that,...

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